Plant once, harvest for years: growing asparagus in a well-maintained bed can provide you with sweet, slender highly nutritious veggies for up to 15 years. In addition, its vibrant, ferny foliage makes an excellent ornamental.

Asparagus is rich in anti-inflammatory nutrients, like quercetin, as well as antioxidants (vitamin C, beta-carotene, vitamin E, and the minerals zinc, manganese, selenium, and glutathione). It is also an excellent source of folic acid, vitamin B1, and vitamin B2 as well as a very good source of niacin, choline, vitamin B6, and pantothenic acid. Asparagus is also rich in dietary fiber (about 3 grams per cup, including about 2 grams of insoluble fiber and 1 gram of soluble fiber) and also contains about 4-5 grams of protein per cup.

Asparagus: Plant Once, Harvest For Years!

Asparagus, like chicory root and Jerusalem artichoke, contains rich concentrations of inulin, a unique type of carbohydrate called a polyfructan. Inulin passes undigested all the way to our large intestine where it becomes an ideal food source (prebiotic) for certain types of bacteria that are associated with better nutrient absorption, lower risk of allergy, and lower risk of colon cancer.

Asparagus is a perennial plant

Growing asparagus requires some attention early on, but once the plants are established they’ll be productive for years. Unlike most vegetables, asparagus plants are perennial. The same plants grow in your garden year after year. The spears that we enjoy as a vegetable are the new shoots that emerge each spring. While it will take a couple of years before you taste the first bite of homegrown asparagus, they will remain in the same place in your garden providing you with delicious nutritious asparagus, season after season for many years — 15, 20, sometimes 30.

Learn everything you need to know about growing your own asparagus here:

Growing Asparagus

Here are some of my favorite asparagus recipes:

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